Resources

Cozy up with some good reads

Dr. Brenda K. Gorman, Contributing Author

Hello everyone. I hope you’ve been enjoying the beautiful autumn and rustling leaves. Rustling, hustling, bustling – it’s been very busy around here preparing for multiple local area presentations and the upcoming ASHA convention on the topic of dual language learners (DLLs).  I’ve also been receiving many requests for recommended reading resources on the topic of DLLs, even a couple from physicians!  The interest is very encouraging, so I would like to share some of my favorite resources below.  As it’s getting a bit chillier, you might want to cozy up with some good reads.

Assessment Resources

Pearson, B. Z., Fernandez, S. C., & Oller, D. K. (1993). Lexical development in bilingual infants and toddlers: Comparison to monolingual norms. Language Learning, 43(1), 93-120.

Peña, E.D., Gillam, R.B., Bedore, L.M., & Bohman, T.M. (2011). Risk for poor performance on a language screening measure for bilingual preschoolers and kindergartenersAmerican Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 20, 302-314. Supporting video: Can Special Needs Kids Be Bilingual?

Simón-Cereijido, G., & Gutiérrez-Clellen, V. (2009). A cross-linguistic and bilingual evaluation of the interdependence between lexical and grammatical domains. Applied Psycholinguistics, 30, 315-337.

Williams, C.J., & McLeod, S. (2012). Speech-language pathologists’ assessment and intervention practices with multilingual children. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 14(3), 292-305.

Intervention Resources

Gorman, B.K., Brice, A.E., & Berman, S. (2012). Reading acquisition program for Spanish-speakers. Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, 19, 49-57.

Lugo-Neris, M. J., Jackson, C. W., & Goldstein, H. (2010). Facilitating vocabulary acquisition of young English language learners. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 41(3), 314–327.

Perozzi, J. A., & Chavez Sanchez, M. L. (1992). The effect of instruction in L1 on receptive acquisition of L2 for bilingual children with language delay. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 23, 348–352.

Ulanoff, S. H., & Pucci, S. L. (1999). Learning words from books: The effects of read aloud on second language vocabulary acquisition. Bilingual Research Journal, 23(4), 319-332.

DLLs with Special Needs

Hambly, C., & Fombonne, E. The impact of bilingual environments on language development in children with Autism Spectrum DisordersJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders (Online First, 22 September 2011). Supporting video: Can Special Needs Kids Be Bilingual?

Kay-Raining Bird, E., Cleave, P., Trudeau, N., Thordardottir, E., Sutton, A., & Thorpe, A. (2005). The language abilities of bilingual children with Down syndrome. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 14, 187–199.  Explores the capacity of Down syndrome children to acquire more than one language. This research is noted by Dr. Brenda Gorman in the Grupo Lingua YouTube video: Can Special Needs Kids Be Bilingual?

Kohnert, K., Yim, D., Nett, K., Kan, P. F., & Duran, L. (2005). Intervention with linguistically diverse preschool children: A focus on developing home language(s)Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 36, 251-263. Supporting video: Can Special Needs Kids Be Bilingual?

Petersen, J.M., Marinova-Todd, S.H., & Mirenda, P. Brief report: An exploratory study of lexical skills in bilingual children with Autism Spectrum DisorderJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, (Online First, 27 September 2011). Supporting video: Can Special Needs Kids Be Bilingual?

Bilingual Children and Educational Issues

Age of First Bilingual Language Exposure as a New Window into Bilingual Reading Development, Kovelman

Menken, K., & Antunez, B. (2001). An overview of the preparation and certification of teachers working with limited English proficient students. Washington, DC: National Clearinghouse of Bilingual Education.

Rolstad, K., Mahoney, K., & Glass, G. V. (2005). The big picture: A meta-analysis of program effectiveness research on English Language Learners. Educational Policy, 19(4), 572-594.

Slavin, R. E., & Cheung, A. (2003).  Effective reading programs for English language learners: A best-evidence synthesis. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Center for Research on the Education of Students Placed At Risk (CRESPAR).

Compilation of articles, journals and publications regarding bilingualism effects on cognitive development and language acquisition and development

Bailystok’s research is referenced by Dr. Brenda Gorman in Grupo Lingua’s YouTube video “Myths about Bilingual Children”. Bialystok-references come from a compilation of sources of her work in this area.

Multiple articles addressing bilingualism from the Center for Applied Linguistics

Intervention Ideas during African American History Month

Dr. Brenda K. Gorman, Contributing Author

Speech-language pathologists are increasingly designing their language interventions to align with school curricula. Of course, this is easier for school-based clinicians who have more communication with classroom teachers and easier access to classroom goals and lesson plans. For clinic-based clinicians, it may be somewhat more challenging to find out what their young clients are learning in the classroom, although parents often have access to this information which they can share with clinicians.

I am a strong supporter of language intervention that expands children’s language skills while also supporting their world and background knowledge. February is African American History Month during which the country celebrates the innumerable contributions that African Americans have made to the economic, cultural, social, and political developmental of the United States. If you are looking for ideas for language intervention themes this month, African American history is the perfect topic for clients of all ages. Think of all the rich content knowledge and vocabulary related to social studies and social language that you can incorporate: historical figures, government, geography, maps, cultures, timelines, feelings, and so many more.

Susie King Taylor

For example, one of the common core standards for second graders (ELA-Literacy.RI.2.3) indicates that children will describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text. For third graders (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.3), it states that children that children will describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect. According to one standard for sixth through eighth graders (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.10), students will read and comprehend history/social studies texts complexity band proficiently.

There are excellent resources available on the web, including children’s books and lesson plans, to help you plan intervention this month. Just a few are listed below. Enjoy African American History!

http://www.africanamericanhistorymonth.gov/

http://www.africanamericanhistorymonth.gov/teachers.html

http://www.readingrockets.org/calendar/blackhistory

https://www.teachervision.com/black-history-month/lesson-plan/48600.html

Bullying: On Our Radar

There is a good chance that each of you remembers at least one school bully while growing up. You’ve also probably heard one or more horrendous stories in the news about children who have been bullied. Bullying is a problem that occurs not only in the U.S. Just recently, Chilean newspapers reported a shocking story about a nine-year-old boy who died following cerebral hemorrhage which resulted from a gruesome act of bullying. This entry is for him and for all who suffer from bullying.

In our profession, bullying needs to be on our radar. I think back to when I worked as an SLP in the schools and wonder how many children on my caseload might have been affected by bullying without my knowledge. It’s an issue that I’ve always discussed with students in my fluency classes, but having learned more about the relationship between bullying and other disabilities, I will definitely be integrating the topic into other courses as well.

According to a review of research by PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center, children with disabilities are at significantly higher risk of being bullied than children without disabilities. According to the Massachusetts Advocacy for Children (2009), for example, 88% of children with autism sampled were reported to have been victims of bullying. Even in typically developing children, bullying has a negative impact not only on social-emotional development, but also on academic achievement. Therefore, it is a serious problem that further compounds the difficulties which children with disabilities already experience.

Because bullying can interfere with children’s access to a free, appropriate public education (FAPE), the PACER Center has put together a document on The Individualized Education

Program (IEP) and Bullying which provides valuable strategies that can be included in a child’s IEPs to help stop the bullying that he/she experiences. For example, strategies may include allowing the child to leave class early to avoid the bully in the hallway between classes, holding in-services for staff and students about policies regarding bullying, and shadowing of the child in the lunchroom or playground where the bullying typically happens.

Again, bullying is a common problem for which SLPs should be on the lookout. Hopefully, we will see more research conducted to better understand what drives people to bully and how professionals can help them while enhancing prevention.

Additional helpful websites:

In Other Languages

www.pacer.org/bullying/resources/publications/spanish-materials.asp

www.pacer.org/bullying/resources/publications/somali-materials.asp

Policies and Laws by State

www.stopbullying.gov/laws

Helping Kids Deal with Bullying

http://kidshealth.org/parent/emotions/behavior/bullies.html

Autism and Safety

www.nationalautismassociation.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/NAA-Bullying-Brochure.pdf

Walk a Mile in Their Shoes: Bullying and the Child with Special Needs

www.abilitypath.org/areas-of-development/learning–schools/bullying/articles/walk-a-mile-in-their-shoes.pdf